Famous Cafes in Paris

Boulangeries and Magasins de vin are essential in the life of many Parisians. So are les cafés. In certain parts of the city, every other shop appears to be a bakery, wine merchant or café.
 
It is a treat to wander down boulevards, admiring the window displays or inhaling the scrumptious smells wafting out of a café or bakery. And, as you stroll along, inevitably you will pass the quintessential French scene – a restaurant with outdoor tables, red awnings and colorful flowers.
 
Many of the cafes you pass in Paris are renowned. The Café Le Procope, founded in 1686 by Francesco Procopio Dei Coltelli, a Sicilian Native of Palermo, became a popular meeting place for Molière and other literary types. Continuing this trend, Voltaire, Rousseau and others frequented the establishment. According to French Moments, “Benjamin Franklin, then Ambassador to France, worked on the U.S. Constitution at a table” inside Café Le Procope. Other cafes, such as Le Deux Magots and the Café de Flore became popular gathering places in the 1920’s by many intellectuals and literary types, including Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Hemingway and Picasso.

I mention another famous café, Le Dôme, in my sequel, French Illusions: From Tours to Paris. Located in Montparnasse, on the Left Bank, this café first opened in 1898. During the 1900’s, the café was known as “the Anglo-American café,” attracting many of the famous poets, artists, writers, models and art enthusiasts living in this area at that time.

Comments

  1. Vallypee says:

    Ah, Paris cafés…so atmospheric! Lovely images and descriptions, Linda!

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